Blue Jays Sean Reid-Foley continues strong 2016

Toronto’s Sean Reid-Foley is having one of the better seasons in the Blue Jays farm system, Jays from the Couch take a look at his 2016 stats

 

 

When Toronto drafted Sean Reid-Foley in the 49th overall in the 2nd round of the 2014 draft, they were hoping he could eventually develop into a middle of the rotation starter. Unfortunately, heading into 2016 the 6’3″ right-handed pitcher out of Florida had yet to come close to those lofty expectations.

Credit: MLBfarm.com
Credit: MLBfarm.com

What SRF had shown in his previous three seasons was a pitcher who struggles to repeat his delivery. In 2015 Reid-Foley finished with 1.46 and 2.68 K/BB with Dunedin and Lansing respectively. In 17 Midwest starts, the RHP walked 43 batters in 63.1IP. As poor as he was at limiting free passes, Sean Reid-Foley excelled at striking out batters, whiffing batters at a rate of 12.79 K/9. His K/9 numbers are down from a year ago posting 9.16 with Lansing and 10.38 in 2 starts with the D-Jays.

Making his Florida State League debut with the Dunedin Blue Jays on July 5th, SRF scattered 2 hits over 5 innings, striking out 2 with zero walks. He didn’t make it out of the 4th inning again in July. Sean Reid-Foley would walk 24 batters over his next 7 FSL starts, finishing with a record of 1-5 and a 5.23ERA.

Credit: MLBfarm.com
Credit: MLBfarm.com

With Toronto’s commitment to slowly developing their prospects Reid-Foley was returned to Lansing to begin the 2016 season, joining fellow pitching prospects Jonathan Harris and Angel Perdomo. This turned out to be the right decision, as SRF has put up his best numbers of his short professional career.

The biggest difference between Sean Reid-Foley’s 2015 performance and his 2016 performance to date is a more consistent release point. This consistency has allowed him to better utilize a lively fastball which consistently sits between 93 mph and 95 mph, but touches 97 mph on occasion. Reid-Foley continues to improve his slider, change and curve, but it’s been the command of his FB that has allowed him to lower his Advanced-A BB/9 from 6.61 to 2.08. This has also allowed him to pitch deeper into games, having not made it out of the 6th inning once in his first two seasons. He’s averaging 15 pitches per inning and has already pitched 6 innings three times in 2016, 7IP three times and 8IP once. He’s thrown 100 pitches once and has set career high in strike outs (10 and 12) twice in the past 30 days.

Credit: MLBfarm.com
Credit: MLBfarm.com

With two months remaining in the 2016 season the 20 yr-old from Sandalwood, Florida will no doubt eclipse his career high in IP (96) and strike outs (125) he set in 2015. He should also set career lows in FIP (3.06 with Lansing and 1.53 with Dunedin), WHIP (1.12 with Lansing and 0.62 with Dunedin) and BABIP (.277 with Lansing and .172 with Dunedin) if he maintains his current form.

Credit: MLBfarm.com
Credit: MLBfarm.com

SRF doesn’t just strike batters out, he’s demonstrated an ability to keep the ball in the yard. In just under 200IP (189.2) Reid-Foley has allowed just 6 long balls, with 2 coming in 2016. He’s averaged 1.35 GO/AO through his professional career and is sporting an impressive 1.73 GO/AO in 13 starts.

Two months into the 2016 season SRF is showing that the Toronto Blue Jays made the right decision in drafting the right-handed pitcher in the in the 2nd round. Reid-Foley was already considered one of Toronto’s Top Pitching Prospect prior to his breakout, but not he appears to be positioning himself as ‘THE’ Top Pitching Prospect in the Blue Jays system.

 

 

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Lover of all things Toronto Blue Jays. Blue Jays MiLB fanatic. I strive for average while stumbling onto above average. Rogers isn’t cheap. Baseball is a business. Your right, but I’m more right.

Ryan Mueller

Lover of all things Toronto Blue Jays. Blue Jays MiLB fanatic. I strive for average while stumbling onto above average. Rogers isn’t cheap. Baseball is a business. Your right, but I’m more right.