Blue Jays 2017 Year in Review: Ryan Noda

 

After being drafted this past June, all Ryan Noda did was put his name firmly on the Blue Jays map with a strong offensive showing

 

 

The Blue Jays drafted Ryan Noda in the 15th round of the 2017 MLB Draft. When we talked with him on JFtC Radio, we asked him about his draft day. He was out watching his sister’s softball game, when he saw his name on the Draft Tracker. Since that day when he was in the stands at a softball game, he has had a whirlwind season.

 

After signing his pro deal, he began raking in Bluefield, West Virginia and hasn’t looked back. The product of the University of Cincinnati is a lefty hitting, first base (and occasional outfielder) 21 year old who stands 6’3″ and brought some serious offensive production to the Bluefield Blue Jays’ lineup.

 

Register Batting
Year Age AgeDif Lev G PA R H 2B 3B HR RBI SB CS BB SO BA OBP SLG OPS
2017 21 0.7 Rk 66 276 62 78 18 3 7 39 7 4 59 60 .364 .507 .575 1.082
Provided by Baseball-Reference.com: View Original Table
Generated 9/12/2017.

 

Noda showed some power, hitting a home run every 30.6 at bats, for a total of seven in 66 games. He also hit 18 doubles. His ISO of .210 is rather impressive. However, what might grab more attention is his ability to get on base. Reaching base in over half your at bats is rather good, in case the .507 OBP mark didn’t catch your eye. He had almost as many walks as he did strike outs, which is something that the organization should like about him.

 

Monthly Breakdown

 

June

In the 9 games after signing, Noda made his selection look like a stroke of genius. In 35 at bats, he would hit for a line of .426/.459/.714, with the majority of his time hitting his way on base. He walked twice in those 9 games. He hit for 25 total bases. It was definitely a good start to pro ball in the Blue Jays system.

 

July

All he did in 28 July games is show he was even more comfortable at the plate as he eclipsed the previous month’s performance. He would collect 40 hits (62 total bases), score 32 runs, 9 doubles, 3 HR, 15 RBI while walking 29 times and striking out just 20. He also stole five bases. His July OPS was a robust 1.269, a mark almost a full .100 above his June mark.

 

August

The 29 August game saw Noda’s average slip to .258 as he hit 23 times with 7 doubles and 2 HR. What is interesting to note is that he actually drove in more runs (19) in August than the previous two. While his average took a dip, his on base ability didn’t fall as dramatically. Obviously, if you’re not hitting as much, you’re not getting on base as much. But, his .450 OBP is very likable.

 

Splits

As a left handed hitter, one would expect that Noda might have had issues facing pitchers of the same handedness. And, that might hold true, but not in the way you might expect:

 

2017 Player Batting Splits
Split G PA H 2B HR RBI BB SO BA OBP SLG OPS IBB
vs RHP as LHB 64 217 65 15 7 33 44 49 .378 .507 .610 1.117 4
vs LHP as LHB 34 59 13 3 0 6 15 11 .310 .508 .429 .937 0
2 outs, RISP 48 66 20 6 1 15 16 9 .400 .545 .580 1.125 3
Provided by Baseball-Reference.com: View Original Table
Generated 9/12/2017.

 

Sure, his numbers were better against right handed pitching, but there is no way we can call a .937 OPS against lefties a difficulty. He got on base just as much against righties. He did not hit a single home run off a lefty pitcher, though.

 

As well, if you are into the idea of a guy being “clutch”. Noda certainly showed an ability to hunker down and be productive with runners in scoring position and 2 outs. His OPS of 1.125 would indicate him ‘rising to the occasion’ as it were.

 

Overall

Noda was helped out by a very generous BABIP in his first season. According to the Baseball Cube, Noda’s 2017 BABIP was…wait for it…ahem .470! the easiest way to explain BABIP is to call it luck (ya gotta be lucky to be good and good to be lucky, right?). If we go with that definition, Noda may have been playing with horseshoes for cleats, a rabbit’s foot in his back pocket after having gone to McDonald’s for a shamrock shake. That’s  the kind of “luck” we’re talking about. Sure, good, solid contact might have had a little something to do with this.

 

While his bat was enough to make the front office take notice, his glove work was not too shabby either. He saw some time in CF and in LF. Those mostly came as he was shifted there later in games, but 7 starts came in RF. He started at 1B 48 games and made 5 errors. He didn’t make a single error in the outfield.

 

2018 Outlook

Projecting where Ryan Noda will go in 2018 can be a bit tricky. He showed that hitting in the Appalachian League was a relatively easy task for him. So, with numbers like above, one might think that a jump to Dunedin might be in order. But, bypassing Lansing might be a bit of a stretch. Jays From the Couch MiLB guru, Ryan Mueller, thinks that he’ll go to Lansing and see more time at DH with Kacy Clemens possibly taking more reps at first due to his better glove.

 

 

 

With numbers like this, DH might be a good spot for him. Or, the club could look to capitalize on his outfield ability if there is too much competition at 1B. What we wouldn’t want to see is a prospect relegated to the DH role. The way baseball is going, the DH spot is not what it used to be. Teams want a guy who can be more than a one trick pony.

 

The Baseball Draft Report had this to say about Noda:

 [He] is an underrated athlete with plus raw power and unique (gloveless) swing mechanics. I’ve gone back and forth about his best position in pro ball — his experience in the outfield and strong arm could give him a shot there depending on what team he lands with — but ultimately went with first base for reasons both good (he’s quite strong there defensively) and practical (physically, he looks more like a first baseman than a corner outfielder).

 

His bat will play as he moves forward. It remains to be seen just where the organization feels his glove is a best fit. What will they do to keep his bat in a lineup? He certainly can stick at first base for the foreseeable future, but sometimes those decisions have nothing to do with the player themselves. Sometimes, it comes down to organizational needs.

 

 

 

HEAD ON OVER TO THE JAYS FROM THE COUCH VS ALS STORE AND GET SOME GREAT SWAG THAT YOU WILL LOOK GREAT IN AND YOU CAN FEEL GREAT ABOUT.

 

YOU CAN ALSO HEAD TO OUR JAYS FROM THE COUCH VS ALS FUNDRAISING PAGE TO MAKE A TAX DEDUCTIBLE DONATION DIRECTLY TO ALS CANADA.

 

 

 

 

THANK YOU FOR VISITING JAYS FROM THE COUCH! CHECK US OUT ON TWITTER @JAYSFROMCOUCH AND INSTAGRAM. LIKE US FACEBOOK. BE SURE TO CATCH THE LATEST FROM JAYS FROM THE COUCH RADIO AND SUBSCRIBE TO OUR YOUTUBE CHANNEL!

 

 

 

Shaun Doyle is a long time Blue Jays fan and writer! He decided to put those things together and create Jays From the Couch. Shaun is the host of Jays From the Couch Radio, which is highly ranked in iTunes, and he has appeared on TV and radio spots.

Shaun Doyle

Shaun Doyle is a long time Blue Jays fan and writer! He decided to put those things together and create Jays From the Couch. Shaun is the host of Jays From the Couch Radio, which is highly ranked in iTunes, and he has appeared on TV and radio spots.